ANOREKSIYA NEVROZA PDF

Fenrilabar Anorexia an-o-REK-see-uh nervosa — often simply called anorexia — is an eating disorder characterized by an abnormally low body weight, an intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of weight. This damage may not be fully reversible, even when the anorexia is under control. Anorexia nervosa in adults and adolescents: As a different approach, the discussions are ongoing that EDs can be assessed along with other disorders which have OCD-like symptoms under? The role of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of eating disorders: American Psychiatric Publishing; Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. Anorexia is also more common among teenagers. However, boys and men have increasingly developed eating disorders, possibly related to growing social pressures.

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Lisa S. Abstract To describe the hormonal adaptations and alterations in anorexia nervosa. Methods We performed a PubMed search of the English-language literature related to the pathophysiology of the endocrine disorders observed in anorexia nervosa, and we describe a case to illustrate these findings. Results Anorexia nervosa is a devastating disease with a variety of endocrine manifestations.

The effects of starvation are extensive and negatively affect the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, adrenal glands, gonads, and bones. Appetite is modulated by the neuroendocrine system, and characteristic patterns of leptin and ghrelin concentrations have been observed in anorexia nervosa.

A thorough understanding of refeeding syndrome is imperative to nutrition rehabilitation in these patients to avoid devastating consequences. Although most endocrinopathies associated with anorexia nervosa reverse with recovery, short stature, osteoporosis, and infertility may be long-lasting complications.

We describe a year-old woman who presented with end-stage anorexia nervosa whose clinical course reflects the numerous complications caused by this disease.

Conclusions The effects of severe malnutrition and subsequent refeeding are extensive in anorexia nervosa. Nutrition rehabilitation is the most appropriate treatment for these patients; however, it must be done cautiously.

The incidence of AN is currently around 8 per persons per year, and the prevalence rate of AN is 0. All organs are affected by this state of disordered eating and starvation. Severe malnutrition leads to electrolyte disturbances and can ultimately cause multiorgan system failure.

Many of the hormonal aberrancies described in AN are essentially protective, aiming to conserve metabolic energy during prolonged periods of caloric restriction. The purpose of this article is to outline the metabolic derangements seen throughout the endocrine system in persons with AN. The most clearly understood endocrine disturbances of AN are those related to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis: thyroid, adrenal, and gonadal.

AN also has dramatic effects on normal growth, bone turnover, nutrient metabolism, and appetite regulation. To characterize the hormonal adaptations and alterations in anorexia nervosa, we performed a PubMed search of the English-language literature related to the pathophysiology of the endocrine disorders observed in anorexia nervosa, and we describe a case to illustrate these findings. She was consuming calories a day. On admission her temperature was She was Her body mass index BMI was Physical examination revealed an extremely cachetic woman.

She had shallow breathing and bradycardia. Her skin was cool, and her extremities had profound atrophy. She exhibited poor insight into her condition. Laboratory test results on admission were notable for neutropenia, hypokalemia, hypoglycemia, and transaminitis.

Her albumin concentration was 3. An electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia. Other laboratory tests showed the following values: thyroid-stimulating hormone, 4. A cosyntropin-stimulation test was performed with a robust response from She had intermittent hypotension, hypothermia, and hypoglycemia during her hospitalization.

She was restless and exhibited excessive activity, rapidly lapping hospital corridors. Medically, her condition warranted admission to the intensive care unit; however, she refused for fear of activity restriction. She was recommended to eat calories per day with a plan to slowly increase to a goal of calories per day.

However, she did not adhere to these recommendations. It was discovered that she was hiding food and purging. Supplemental nutrition and total parenteral nutrition were eventually started, and she was transferred to the intensive care unit to monitor for refeeding syndrome. Her condition markedly worsened.

While receiving total parenteral nutrition, her electrolytes were maintained with supplementation, but her liver enzyme concentrations tripled. She developed notable edema and tachycardia. Despite this, she continued to resist supplemental nutrition. During her hospitalization, she fell from bed and developed an acute subdural hematoma requiring urgent neurosurgical operation. Postoperatively, her laboratory values slowly normalized with progressive feeds.

The patient was discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation facility on cycled tube feeds and a regular diet at a weight of 34 kg Likewise, primary amenorrhea is characteristic of the prepubertal anorexic girl. Thus, even early abnormal eating behaviors, particularly with restrictive fat intake, can disrupt gonadotropin secretion and lead to amenorrhea 4.

Women with AN are hypoestrogenic secondary to hypothalamic dysfunction. Disturbed gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH secretion leads to abnormal gonadotropin pulsatility, resulting in insufficient ovarian stimulation for ovulation and ultimately decreased estrogen production. There is also loss of the positive feedback response where low estrogen levels normally stimulate gonadotropin secretion.

Of note, there is also decreased aromatization of androgens to estrogens in fat tissue secondary to lack of adipose , however this plays a minor role in the overall hypoestrogenic state 3 , 5.

Pulsed GnRH injections can induce menses in women with hypogonadotrophic amenorrhea, as in AN, indicating normal pituitary and ovarian responsiveness to appropriate hypothalamic stimulation 3 , 6. Menstrual abnormalities in hypothalamic dysfunction are manifestations of disturbed secretion of GnRH. Decreased caloric intake changes the pulsatility of GnRH causing abnormal responses of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone FSH. Specifically, the gonadotropins have immature secretion patterns, with an increased follicle-stimulating hormone to luteinizing hormone LH ratio and decreased frequency and amplitude of luteinizing hormone bursts 4 , 7.

Qualitative differences in the glycosylation patterns of gonadotropins are described in AN 8 , 9. These hormonal aberrations result in a prolonged follicular phase and an insufficient luteal phase Marked caloric restriction impairs luteinizing hormone pulsatility Thus, there is inadequate gonadotropin stimulation to initiate ovulation, consistent with hypothalamic amenorrhea Hypothalamic amenorrhea in AN is associated with a partial gonadotropin deficiency, but with nutritional rehabilitation and maintained weight recovery, this deficiency is potentially reversible 4 , Amenorrhea in active AN is a protective physiologic adaptation to prevent pregnancy at a time of compromised nutrition.

Luteal deficiency has been observed historically in times of famine and food rationing such as those in World War I and World War II Infertility results from both anovulation and self-imposed restrictions on sexual activity in AN 3.

Of note, silent eating disorders are not uncommon in women seeking therapy for infertility Establishing regular menstrual cycles is an important milestone for women recovering from AN Fertility is often restored with appropriate treatment of the eating disorder; however, persistent amenorrhea remains more common in women who have recovered from AN than in the general population Resumption of menses is best assessed biochemically with a rise in serum estradiol levels Restoration of appropriate signaling in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis appears to be facilitated by a variety of hormones.

In women with AN, elevations in baseline cortisol are predictive of increased body fat content, which in a study by Misra et al was shown to be a good indicator of menstrual recovery in anorexic adolescent girls Interestingly, in a study of female endurance athletes by Rickenlund et al, menstrual frequency was negatively correlated with cortisol concentration Biochemically, anorexic patients have a constellation of thyroid hormone abnormalities similar to sick euthyroid syndrome with notably low T3 levels and low to normal T4 levels due to decreased peripheral conversion Patients with AN generally have normal to below-normal thyroid-stimulating hormone levels These patients are generally not considered to be hypothyroid despite evidence of peripheral thyroid hormone deficiency as documented by delayed Achilles reflex half-relaxation time and subsequent improvements with exogenous T3 Overall improvements in thyroid hormone profiles are observed with nutritional rehabilitation Altered thyroid hormone levels in individuals with AN are multifactorial.

In AN, as in any condition of chronic illness or starvation, there is decreased peripheral deiodination of T4 to T3 with increased conversion to inactive reverse T3 The presence of carbohydrates appears to be important in stimulating the peripheral conversion of T4 to active T3 Hypothalamic release of thyrotropin-releasing hormone may be impaired in AN, preventing the typically robust thyroid-stimulating hormone response to low peripheral thyroid hormone levels Exogenous thyrotropin-releasing hormone can illicit a normal or delayed response in thyroid-stimulating hormone, and this delay in response reverses with weight gain Malnutrition and subsequently low insulinlike growth factor 1 IGF-1 levels likely cause thyroid atrophy in AN A decrease in overall thyroid volume has been observed in anorexic patients compared with age-matched control participants; atrophy of the thyroid may further exacerbate depressive symptoms and ongoing starvation As previously mentioned, the biochemical thyroid abnormalities seen in AN generally correct with weight gain.

Unfortunately, the psychologic problems and personality traits are not rectified with weight gain alone. Thus, thyroid dysfunction is not the sole etiology of the psychologic pathology observed in AN, but it is possible that abnormal thyroid function may exacerbate existing psychologic problems Thus, these patients generally exhibit hypercortisolemia Elevated cortisol levels in patients with AN result from increased cortisol pulsatility and secretory burst frequency, as well as decreased T3-regulated metabolism of cortisol The circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion is preserved in AN 12 , Cortisol secretion is also stimulated by hypoglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, conditions commonly seen in AN Dynamic testing of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in AN reveals abnormal suppression of cortisol production with either an oral glucose load 30 or from dexamethasone in conjunction with very robust responses to corticotropin stimulation and weak responses to corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation 30 — The poor cortisol response to corticotropin-releasing hormone is suggestive of hypersecretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone as a means of overcoming cortisol resistance.

This may be explained by glucocorticoid receptor abnormalities Pituitary corticotrophs remain responsive to the inhibitory effects of free fatty acids in AN even in the setting of hypercortisolemia Chronic corticotropin-releasing hormone elevations may also be partly responsible for maintaining the state of chronic starvation 5.

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity is an established feature of AN and depression. AN is also associated with alterations in vasopressin secretion, manifesting as problems with appropriate dilution of urine Vasopressin has a greater involvement in hypercortisolemia of depression, while corticotropin-releasing hormone appears to have a dominant role in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity in AN Patients with AN and high cortisol levels do not typically display features of Cushing syndrome, as they have low baseline levels of adipose tissue and cortisol resistance 5 , Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity appears reversible.

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Anoreksiya nedir? Anoreksiya hastalığının belirtileri neler? Diyet ile mi başlar?

Anorexia nervosa: treatment for children and young people Family therapy Many children and young people with anorexia find it helpful to have a talking therapy that family members or carers can take part in too. This is known as family therapy. It involves working with a practitioner for example a therapist , and allows you to explore how anorexia has affected you and how your family can support you to get better. You should be able to choose whether to have therapy sessions together with your family or separately you can also have a mixture of both.

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Anoreksiya Nervoza Nedir? Nedenleri, Belirtileri ve Tedavisi

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by low body weight, propensity for drastic undereating, intense fear of gaining weight… Classification Anorexia nervosa is one of two major types of eating disorders. The other is bulimia nervosa , which is characterized by binge eating followed by compensatory behaviour such as self-induced vomiting , fasting, or excessive exercise. The restricting type is characterized as unhealthy weight loss due to food restriction. Although some people with anorexia nervosa also engage in binge eating followed by purging, in bulimia nervosa body weight generally remains near or above normal.

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Anoreksiya belirtileri neler... Anoreksiya hangi şikayetlerle ortaya çıkar?

Lisa S. Abstract To describe the hormonal adaptations and alterations in anorexia nervosa. Methods We performed a PubMed search of the English-language literature related to the pathophysiology of the endocrine disorders observed in anorexia nervosa, and we describe a case to illustrate these findings. Results Anorexia nervosa is a devastating disease with a variety of endocrine manifestations. The effects of starvation are extensive and negatively affect the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, adrenal glands, gonads, and bones. Appetite is modulated by the neuroendocrine system, and characteristic patterns of leptin and ghrelin concentrations have been observed in anorexia nervosa. A thorough understanding of refeeding syndrome is imperative to nutrition rehabilitation in these patients to avoid devastating consequences.

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Anoreksiya Nervoza Nedir? Nedenleri, Belirtileri ve Tedavisi

Clinical features of anorexia nervosa Clinical features of anorexia nervosa Clinical features of anorexia nervosa Restriction of energy intake resulting in low body weight. Low weight is defined as less than minimally normal in adults typically BMI less than Intense fear of gaining weight. Preoccupation with food and weight is often related to a pursuit of thinness, or later in the course of illness, a fear of gaining weight. Other behaviours may include repeated weighing, measuring and checking in the mirror. Behaviour that interferes with weight gain.

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